On Island Time in Paradise with WFR – Puerto Rico

October 13, 2012

To quote Ricky Ricardo, “You got a lot of ‘splainin’ to do Lucy.” And, I guess I do. My absence has been noticed by some and for that I am both grateful and sorry. I will try to fill you in on some of the things that I have been up to for the past, almost two months. Le t me tell you there has been a lot of water under the bridge since we rode out Isaac in Martinique. We have sailed hundreds of miles since I last posted and been to numerous ports all up and down the islands. We have met new friends, explored new places and found scores of private beaches where we felt like we were the only people to have ever been there.
We have spent the past two weeks on Luis Pena` Island, Puerto Rico. We have shared where we have shared Cayo Luis Pena with as many as four other sailboats and as few as … just us. The weather has been wonderful down here. Let’s see it is about 88 degrees in the heat of the afternoon and lower 70s at night. This island is magical. It seems like a deserted island. We spent our days wandering over the entire island and never found a structure. Granted we did not cover the whole island but, we did see an awful lot of it. Three are birds, lizards and or course bugs everywhere. Though we thought about camping on the beach, we always ended up back on the boat. Some nights we slept under the stars on the deck and others when it threatened rain we would sleep below. Every moment here has seemed like a honeymoon. Sweet Pea and I have needed this time together.
Oh, I guess I don’t need to tell you that I convinced her not to teach this year. She has decided to work on another Masters degree. She holds an MBA and is not working on one in economics. The program will probably take around 18 months and I don’t know whether back to teaching or if she will write like she did before she decided to go back to the classroom.
Over the past month we have spent every moment together. We have dived in the shallow waters of the islands, swam in the surf and slept under the stars. Fishing has been good and we have dined like royalty on island fruits and veggies and fish from these protected bays. I have gotten very comfortable with our boat and feel right at home behind its wheel.
Today we are at anchor off of Luquillo, PR. It is our plan to spend the evening walking around town. We have purchased bikes that we have strapped on deck but, tonight it is our plan to walk around, holding hands and acting like newly-weds. We are going to go to an old haunt of mine called Hangover Sport Bar to start the evening and then maybe we will head to the Sting Ray or maybe En Boga for dinner and drinks. All I know is I am the luckiest man on earth to live the life I am living and share it with my soul mate. Depending on what the night holds for us, we may or may not spend the night on the boat tonight.
I promise I will make every effort to post on a more regular basis while trying to update you on our recent travels.

William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise with WFR – Le Marin Martinique

 

August 22, 2012
Just a short post to let everyone know we are safe and sound in the
Hurricane Hole in Le Marin Martinique.  The weather here is nasty but
not dangerous and we are under a tropical storm warning. Right now the
temperature is around 75 degrees F. and the wind is blowing out of the
east at about 15 knots.  It is really not expected to be that bad here
but we thought we would hold up in this safe harbor until Isaac passes
over us and heads north to the northern Caribbean islands and wherever
else he decides to visit.
We got into Martinique early yesterday and went ashore to buy some
provisions: water, canned goods, (some of those canned goods consisted
of four cases of beer…actually bottled, Biere Lorraine, considered by
many to be the best beer in the Caribbean, but we considered them
canned none the less), a beautiful fish that is cooking right now,
fresh fruits (limes, etc.) and veggies and three fifths of Saint James
Rum. We topped off our diesel tank in case we need the generator and
purchased only the necessities so we could enjoy the storm.
Isaac is going to pass over us some time tonight or in the moring and
as is expected to turn to the northwest as he moves through.  We have
no real worries where we are.  We are even planning on spending the
night on our boat. Let’s see I have fantastic company, great music,
adult beverages, island fare and for now a dry place to stay out of
the storm.  For some reason I feel like I should be listening to a
Jackson Brown album like in the Jimmy Buffett song, but I am not.  I
am listening to Swim Skinny with a rum on the rocks in my hand and a
fork turning a fish on the stove in my other.
William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise with WFR – Virgin Islands

 

August 17, 2012

It has been a while since my last post and I would like to say I am
sorry but, I am really not.  I have been having a blast.  If I had
known that owning my own boat would mean that I had more independence
and not less, I would have tried to buy one before now.  We have been
moving from place to place through islands.  I was not sure of my
ability as a sailor a few weeks ago but now I have much more
confidence in my ability to stay on top of the ocean and not end up
beneath it.  I am not yet comfortable in really rough weather but I
have learned when I should find a safe port and dash for it.
Since I last wrote to you we have sailed from the U.S. Virgin Isles to
Marigo, Anguilla, Sin Maarten, Saint Barthelemy, Antiqua, Montserrat,
Basseterre and today we have been moored off the coast of Dominica and
the town of Roseau.  In the morning we will be leaving for Martinique.
I have been looking forward to arriving in Martinque for a good while.
The weather has been sort of “iffy” down here but, it is hurricane
season.  The storms that have passed us have been just strong enough
to be a real wakeup call for us but not frightening enough to change
our minds about being on the water.  The strongest winds we have been
in were about 40 knots and the biggest seas about nine feet.  Honestly
our vessel handled it well and protected us when we needed it.
Sailing and the peaceful, relaxing motion of the water is the perfect
backdrop for the music of the tropics.  I have been watching
www.troprock.co and picking up a few ideas for our listening pleasure
while we are at sea and in port. The other day, John at troprock.co
featured Hugo Duarte and I listened to a few of his tracks and, I have
to tell you.  His music reminded me of some of the time I spent down at
the Florabama when I was in high school and college and probably too
many times to count since then. I think the drunkest I have ever been
was a month I spent there one night.
Anyway, we spent several days in safe harbor while we were waiting out
a storm that didn’t quite materialize.  There were some heavy rains
but we took the opportunity to enjoy a little wine while watching a
listening to a storm on the deck of the boat. When the rain was not
playing her music on the deck above us we were listening to the sounds
of the islands on our onboard ipod system.
I learned a long time ago that every day is a story waiting to be
told.  Each day, as boring as it may seem at the time is full of
stories that should be remembered, saved, embellished and told to
those willing to listen.  My life is definitely that way.  Every day
is unique and I wish that I could share them all with you.  This
paradise I call my life is being lived in the Caribbean but, if I were
kayaking down the Colorado, hiking a trail in the Smoky Mountains or
sitting on a pier on a lake in Wisconsin, I know that my life is worth
living.  We may be pretty insignificant when you think about our size
compared to a mountain, an island or the ocean but we are a part of
this great universe and as we are passing through it our part is not
insignificant.  We are here for a reason even if it is just to enjoy
our own little space on this earth.  Well, I am enjoying mine and
trying not to take even one second of it for granted.  I am blessed to
be where I am and sharing my moments with Sweet Pea and my words with
you.
William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise – WFR – Cruz Bay

July 21, 2012
Here are a couple of status updates from my Facebook:
July 17–I just want everyone to know that I made it safe and sound
and I am moored in Elephant Bay just off of St. Thomas in the Virgin
Isles. Great trip…I will blog about it later today. For now I am
getting a little rest.
July 18–I am sorry for being remiss about writing but, I awoke to a
very surprising phone call Wednesday morning. I was told to go on deck
and look due north to a dock that is some ways away from where I am
moored. There was someone waving at me from the dock…I immediately
recognized them…
WFR…on island time in paradise!
July 18 p.m. — Just got back on the boat from dinner. My surprise was
fantastic. My best friend and wife decided to join me. (They are one
and the same person). She has come down to enjoy a little time in
paradise. Her being here just adds to my paradise.
WFR…on island time in paradise.

I think it is necessary to fill in a few blanks before I just start
writing about my travels anymore.  First I am extremely happy that my
wife Kat “Sweet Pea” joined me.  In keeping with her southern
tradition her actual name is Mary Kathryn Elizabeth but, as she says,
it just wasn’t fair to make a little girl learn to spell all of that
so she adopted Kat at an early age because that was quick and easy for
a child to learn. Of course that made it difficult to spell the feline
word that sounds just like that.  This is not the first time she has
joined me.  She is a teacher and spends most of the year in the
states.  She understands my love for travel and I understand her love
of teaching so we spend as much time as we can together.  Some of the
lapses in my writing come when I am returning to the states to see and
be with her.  I am not going to get sappy here, but she is my life and
when we are together I am complete….sappy I know, but true.
Now with that behind us.  She and I are ashore now. We are going to go
to a little place called Amalia Café for Tapas and maybe more.  I have
been there before and their pasta of the day is always worth the
visit.  Sweet Pea has never been and I am looking forward to showing
her this place.  I am sure we will enjoy a bottle of wine and of
course the catching up we will do.  I was home a few weeks ago when I
was AWOL from here but, even though it was only a couple of weeks ago
we will have a lot of catching up to do.
I guess you have figured out that I can post from my boat now but, it
is not convenient and even worse it is costly in most places so, I
will still be updating most often when I am ashore.
This morning we stayed onboard for a good while.  Once we decided it
was to time to venture out we enjoyed coffee and tea on deck and then
made plans for the day.

We spent the morning walking around the streets close to the bay and
found scores of places to shop, meet people and snack and feast on the
local culture.  We have enjoyed seeing just a small sampling of what
this island has to offer.  There are a few clouds overhead and just
the normal chance of a tropical shower during the day.  We are going
to walk around for a while longer after enjoying a couple of cold
bottles of Blackbeard Ale…I don’t think this is actually made here but
it is good and cold and a great beer to share.  When we finish up here
we will continue our walking tour and then head to Amalia Café for a
late afternoon meal.
It is our plan right now, to eat and then head back to the boat and
then cruise east and north to Cruz Bay where we will moor and then
tour St. John.  I don’t think it is but about 15 miles if I am worth
anything at navigating.  The trip should only take a couple or three
islands depending on the wind.  For now we will go.  I think I am
going to start with the calamari tapas and we will see where we go
from there.
William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise – WFR – Puerto Rico

July 15, 2012
Night has settled on this portion of the Caribbean and though there
are some clouds in the sky, the stars are shining brilliantly
overhead.  It is a dark and almost windless night and the lights of
the city of Ponce are reflecting like Christmas lights on the bay in
front of me as I recline in the front deck of my little boat sipping a
glass of wine and waiting for sunrise.  I have to say I am a little
anxious about heading out on a sailboat all alone.  Though I won’t be
on the water for long at a time, there is a little something unnerving
about it.
For now though, the quiet night and a good glass of Pinot Noir have a
great calming effect on my soul.  I am looking forward with great
anticipation to weighing my anchor and getting under sail.
There is a boat about 50 yards to the south of me with two couples on
it.  Earlier they were on deck listening to ‘70s rock and dancing
under the starlight.  I could hear the strains of the Doors, Van
Morrison, Who, Sly and the Family Stone and others as the music
reverberated off the waves in the night air.  Their party has gone
below deck but the music can still be heard if I am quiet and listen
closely.  If I had to guess, those two couples are down here on a much
needed summer vacation in a rented yacht trying to forget the troubles
of home, work and the day to day grind. By the way the cruiser they
are on is almost twice the size of this craft and probably 10 times as
luxurious.  I hope they are enjoying there time in paradise as much as
I enjoy mine. I will try to blog again as soon as I set anchor on
another distant island.
William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise – WFR – Puerto Rico

July 15, 2012

This morning I slept until the heat of the morning woke me.  I made a
pot of coffee and pulled a croissant out of my cupboard and slipped
into some board shorts and went on deck to sit and enjoy my breakfast
in the Puerto Rican sun.  There was a soft breeze blowing and I could
smell what I assume were the aromas of Sunday lunches being prepared
all over Ponce.  The weather was and still is glorious with only a few
stray clouds overhead.  I could see a squall or two forming and
venting their fury on the water out over the Caribbean.  The
dissipated as quickly as they formed…a typical day in the tropics.  I
am going to stock my boat with appropriate canned goods, veggies and
other groceries think I might need for the first voyage on my boat.  I
think my grocery list should include a couple of cases of beer and
four or five bottles of good Puerto Rican rum.  I plan to buy about
five gallons of bottled water  even though my boat is equipped with a
watermaker.  Because I have never used one of these devises I don’t
quite trust it. Maybe after a little time I will.
It is my plan to lia around on the boat until late afternoon and take
the inflatable into town.  When I bought the boat I decided I didn’t
want to pay the daily rent on a slip so I am moored about 300 or 400
yards out in the bay.  There are a lot of boats moored in the vicinity
so I am not worried about security while I am onshore.  Until then, I
will be chilling.
My time here in Puerto Rico has been wild.  This time of year is too
warm for most vacationers from North America to venture down but
almost every season here is tourist season here. Let’s see’ I landed
had dinner and a drink and bought a boat.  I went from traveler to
sailor in one day.  Well guess what. I am still a traveler.  I just
hope that this boat helps me in my travels and doesn’t tie me down.
If I have been thinking correctly, I will not need to hop from hotel
to hotel and that could easily save me the cost of the this boat in
just a few months.  Let’s see if this boat is a whole in the water
where I throw money or not.
I am looking forward to trying my hand as a captain.  I have sailed
off and on for most of my life and have a lot of experience in the
waters close to land in the Gulf of Mexico and again close to the
islands all over the Caribbean.  Most of my time has been sailing
smaller boats than this one even though this one is small by a lot of
people’s standards.  Again, I am looking forward to taking off and
trying my hand at skippering my own boat in open water.  A little
confession: I have checked, no studied the charts on board and have
charted a trip from here to St. Thomas staying as close to the islands
as I can until I get to know the feel of her.  I will leave at first
light in the morning and head west and sail north of Vieques to
Culebra.  I will see how long it takes me to get there and then move
on westward to St. Thomas.  The long range weather forecast is good so
other than the occasional squall I should not have any weather
problems on this leg of my trip. My boat is equipped with GPS, radar
and two radios that I don’t fully know how to operate but can use well
enough to send out a “mayday” if I need to.
I need to stop writing for a bit and enjoy this beautiful tropical
island.  I am sitting here in the cockpit of the boat, finishing up my
last cup of coffee and a glass of fresh orange juice listening to Bush
Man perform  In the Arms of a Woman on the CD player.  In the
background the sound of the small waves lapping at the side of my boat
relax me completely as I am waiting on the day to roll by.  I will go
for now and begin to make the final arrangements for my next trip
deeper into paradise.
Where is that bottle of rum, this orange juice could use a little kick.
William Fair Roberts….on island time in paradise.

On Island Time in Paradise – WFR – I Bought a Boat.

July 13, 2012
Unfortunately, Martinique is going to have to wait a while.  Last Saturday evening I went to dinner in a little place that was
recommended to me by a friend in the states.  I was sitting at the bar eating peas and rice and a grilled grouper talking to a guy from Key Largo.  He told me that he was down here on a vacation to get away from the pressures of his job and the messy divorce he was currently going through.  He said he had been sailing the waters of the Caribbean for the past couple of weeks and had decided to sell his boat.  He assured me it was in his and only his name and that he would sell it to me at a really good price if I wanted it. To say the least I was skeptical.  I told him I was not in the market for and could not really afford to buy a boat on my meager income.  He said, “bud you can’t afford not to buy this boat.”

We ended up sharing a meal and a bottle Captain Morgan Private Stock. We left the café and went to a bar for another drink or two.  Two
ended up in being five more and by that time we had discussed why he was wanting to sell his boat we came down to a price and he said he needed to make enough off of it to get back home in  first class style.  He said his wife was about to get it declared as hers even
though she hated to sail and her name was not on the bill of sale or the title.  He said he would rather a perfect stranger have it than her.  His only thought was that she should go to someone with a love for the sea that would get good use out of her.  He said if I didn’t buy her he would find someone else to sell her to.  After hours of discussion he offered her to me at the  unbelievably low price of $2,250.  That was the exact cost of a charter captain and his sail boat for the trip back to Key Largo. I told him I could scrape up the money if I had it wired in from my bank account in the states but I wanted to make certain that he still wanted to do this in the morning when his head was clear from the clouds cast on it by really good rum we had been enjoying. I told him that I would meet him at the boat the next morning and if he was still serious I would get the money wired down and we would make the transaction complete.  He said he all of the paperwork with him, including his original bill of sale. He told me her name and I immediately thought I would like to change it and that will have to take place before I could take ownership.

The next morning I showed up at the boat, not really expecting him to be there.  He was there sitting on the deck smoking a long extremely black cigar and drinking a large mug of equally black coffee. “What do you think?” he asked as he saw me walking down the dock to the boat.  He knew what I thought because of the big smile across my face. “Do you still want her?” I asked him if he was really serious and he replied, “never more serious in his life.” He said that his soon-to-be ex was cheating on him and that they had agreed to a simple, quiet divorce.  It was at that time that she hired a slick Miami attorney to represent her. One thing led to another and the agreement they had that they could date during the divorce went sour when her lawyer saw the opportunity to make a lot of money off of him and had him photographed  by a private detective in, let’s say, some compromising situations with a young lady in the water off of Naples, Fl.

One thing led to another and his divorce was “headed south”.  He took his boat and a few pieces of jewelry and some expensive watches he had collected through the years and left on his boat.  His original idea was to sell those things and live as an expat for a few months and then head back to face the music. Then he decided it would be better to sell everything he could before it was “frozen” or declared “joint property.”  He sold as much property as he could while he was sailing and was about to head back to Key Largo to liquidate this excuse for a marriage he had.

Anyway, back to the boat.  We worked out the details and I had the money wired to a bank down here and we made the transaction.  It was agreed that we would have a ceremony to purge her from Ledger of the Deep and rename her.  While I do not consider myself to be a particularly superstitious person, I have a friend who owned a sailboat with a name he didn’t like so he just painted over the old name and let it go at that.  His boat was plagued with numerous maladies and was even struck by lightening, not once but twice.  So, if I am going to own a boat with a new name, I am going follow legend and make sure that Poseidon/Neptune, god of the sea has no memory of
her.  We brought in a few locals that we met at a café near the dock and celebrated MY boats new name.  It was important that all records of the original name be completely erased from history.  The previous owner remover her name from the boat and then we shattered the crystal and china that were marked with her name.  He had stationary that we burned and we even had to change the screensaver on his onboard computer so that it didn’t have her name scrolling across it when the computer was idle.   He even went through all of the logs and with a bottle of White-Out he expunged the boat’s name from every page on which she was mentioned by name.  With all of this done we had a local come and paint her new name on the transom and an on the forward name boards.
With all of that was behind us he gave me a full orientation of the boat.  He told me the engine had only a few hours on it and that the
entire boat was in excellent shape.  New sails, electronics, radar, radios, etc. … all new.

So, I am the owner of a well loved, sea worthy sailboat, a Tartan 34 from the mid 1970s. By doing a little searching on the web I have
found that I purchased her for a 10% of her current value.  Not a bad deal even if I wasn’t  wanting to buy or own a sailboat. I have taken her out every  day since I bought here to get use to her and am getting more and more comfortable with her ways the more I sail.  I will be setting sail on my maiden open water voyage in the next day or two with the eventual destination of Martinique but for now I am moored in La Guancha in Ponce, PR.

William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise…sitting on the deck of My Sailboat.

On Island Time in Paradise – WFR – Stateside

July 7, 2012

It has been quite some time since I have posted on my blog.  I have good reason for that but, if I tell you I have been traveling, since that is about all I do, that just does not seem like a valid excuse.

On my last blog post, I was just arriving at on the island of Barbados.  We were off the city of Bridgetown when  I received a call that required me to immediately head north to the U.S.  I guess even when you are in paradise, life still finds a way to get in the way. Within five hours of my last real post I was on a Cessna Skymaster headed north.  That plane took me to San Juan, PR where I got on the next available commercial flight to Florida.

I spent nearly three weeks taking care of unplanned business in the United States and, it was great to go back home for a short while but, I am glad to be back in the islands. While I was in the U.S. I travelled from Miami to Mississippi to Louisiana to Oklahoma City and back to the Mississippi Gulf Coast and then back to the western coast of Florida where I visited with friends.  The business I had to handle was unfortunate but, as always I made the best of my travels.  I found a couple of great places to eat, but one in particular eatery sticks in my mind and, I know I will go back there on my next visit home.  I was in the city of Biloxi, Mississippi during the last week of June, riding down Pass Road toward Keesler Air Force Base.  I was almost at the point where you have to turn right, cross the RR tracks to bypass the base itself when, I saw a converted storefront with a boldly painted sign that said Caribbean Jamaican Restaurant.  I admit that is not a very original name but it looked like a spot you might find in Jamaica.  On the outside there were posters of Bob Marley and the Jamaican flag and other things that hinted that there might be a Jamaican national inside.  As I opened the door to go into the small restaurant of maybe ten or twelve tables I was greeted by a booming voice with a deep island accent.  “Welcome to the Caribbean.”

I picked a tabe and a seat near the back and  then took the menu from the hand of the owner / chef. Suddenly I felt like I was in the islands.  It was early in the evening and the four members of my party were the only ones in this fine little establishment when we arrived but, that changed as the evening went on.  We started with Red Stripe beer for each of us and a bowl of seafood gumbo which we all shared. That was admittedly one of the top three or four bowls of gumbo I have ever consumed.  After gumbo there was another Red Stripe and we basically ordered and shared half of the items on the menu.  We shared  jerk wings, curried chicken, ox tail, peas and rice, cooked cabbage and fried plantains.  There was more food than I could have eaten in a week. We had originally ordered curried goat, but the truck had not arrived with their latest food order and goat was temporarily off of the menu.  I really wanted it and the next time I go to Biloxi I will definitely order it. Even without the goat  but I will tell you that meal was one of the best meals I have ever enjoyed.  The Oxtail was fabulous.  The meat was swimming in a wonderful rich gravy sauce. The ox tail alone would have been meal enough for me but we shared that and everything else. The cabbage was as good as in any Irish pub I have ever been in and the plantains were delicious. I am a huge fan of curry and the curried chicken was second to none.  All-in-all, this was one of the best meals I have ever eaten at any price.  Oh and did I tell you, the entire meal with beer was $60 and change. On the WFR rankings scale it rated a full 5 Caribbean stars. If you find yourself in Biloxi going deep sea fishing, golfing, gambling or if you are just there to visit the new Jimmy Buffett Margaretville Casino, don’t miss the chance to enjoy the best Jamaican food anywhere. Go to the Caribbean Jamaican Restaurant on Pass Road in Biloxi and you too will feel like you are sitting somewhere just south of Cuba in the Caribbean Ocean enjoying the best of Caribbean cuisine.

Now that the fourth of July is behind me, I have found my way back to paradise.  I am sitting at a little beach bar in Ponce, PR waiting for a plane to take me farther south, to a little island I fell in love with more than twenty years ago.  I am off to Martinique.

To quote Jimmy Buffett:
“Well now if I ever live to be an old man
I’m gonna sail down to Martinique
I’m gonna buy me a sweat-stained Bogart suit
And an African parakeet
And then I’ll sit him on my shoulder
And open up my trusty old mind
I gonna teach him how to cuss, teach him how to fuss
And pull the cork out of a bottle of wine.”
I am getting older and this island has been calling me for much too
long and I will be back down there in that corner of paradise by
Sunday. I raise my glass of rum to paradise in front of me, paradise
behind me and to my father who taught me how to enjoy it.  I wish you
all were here.  I am sorry you are not, but I am damn glad I am.

William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise

Quick Note from WFR – Barbados

If I marked this correctly we put almost 200 miles a day behind us by taking shifts at the wheel and pressing hard. A good crew, favorable winds and great captain got us out and back on a great boat.

I have been doing a little traveling…serious traveling over the past few days. I left Saint Lucia sailing for Barbados and evidently we took a wrong turn. We spent eight days at sea. No, it wasn’t an accident, John and Jill just wanted to do some “real” sailing. So, we did. We sailed out into the Atlantic to 14 28 40N 53 00 41W and then sailed northwest to the tiny island of Tintamar where weanchored for one evening in the North Curve and then headed SSW skirting the islands back to Barbados where we sit anchored today watching the clouds blowing overhead. In all we sailed well over 1000 miles to make our 100 mile trip to Bridgetown. We are about to head ashore to gather supplies, dine on the local fare, sip a beer or two and purchase rum to stock our depleted on-board bar.
I promise an update of my recent travels and that story about my first journey as a traveler in the next few days. You know it is difficult to stop the carnival of life long enough to pen a few lines when the world is slipping by so quickly.
WFR…on island time in paradise.

Quick Note from WFR – Barbados

 

I will be moving on at sunrise tomorrow.  The weather is beautiful today with fairly strong easterly winds that will provide headwinds for us as we travel to Barbados tomorrow.  The island lies a little over 100 miles to our east south east and there is a a good chance we will be sailing into some fairly strong rain and thunderstorms.  Welcome to the tropics…

I love this life.
WFR…on island time in paradise.